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The Study Progress Reform

For Bachelor's degree students

The following applies to Bachelor students:

  • The compulsory registration for 60 ECTS per academic year will be abolished, and in future, Bachelor students can withdraw themselves from courses as well as from examinations within a specified deadline.
  • Bachelor students must pass at least 45 ECTS per academic year (an academinc year is 60 ECTS). The active enrolment requirement is cumulative. This means that by default students must have earned 45 ECTS credits after the first year of study, 90 after the second year, and so on. However, other rules may apply on your faculty - make sure to ask your student counsellor. 
  • Each faculty establishes a first-year exam for Bachelor students equivalent to between 30 and 60 ECTS which must be passed before the end of the first academic year.
  • These rules come into force on 1 September 2016.

What does this mean for you as a Bachelor student?

In practice, this means that the requirement for compulsory registration for 60 ECTS courses and examinations per academic year will be abolished. In future, it is therefore the students’ own responsibility to register for examinations and courses. It is also possible for students to withdraw from courses and examinations within a deadline set by the faculty. This applies to compulsory courses and elective courses.

All students must pass a first-year exam equivalent to 30 to 60 ECTS - the number of ECTS is set by the faculty. The exam must be passed after the first academic year.  If the first-year exam is not passed, you may be withdrawn from the degree programme.

An active enrolment requirement of 45 ECTS per academic year will be introduced for Bachelor’s degree programmes. If the first-year exam is equivalent to 45 ECTS or more, the active enrolment requirement for the first year of the Bachelor’s degree programme will no longer apply.

The maximum time to degree will be specified in the academic regulations within a time frame of three years plus 6 months or three years plus one year. Read about the maximum time to degree further down this page.

Six months to one year after the student should have completed his/her degree programme, a check will be carried out to see if the student has completed his/her degree programme within the specified time frame. The purpose of this is to identify and withdraw students who have not completed their degree programme.

Particularly for BEng students:

The rules for BEng graduates will be updated in the year 2017 - until then, the existing rules are applicable.

For Master's degree students

The following applies to Master’s degree students:

  • The compulsory registration for 60 ECTS per academic year will be abolished, and in future, Master’s degree students can withdraw from courses as well as from exams within a specified deadline. However, they will be registered automatically for the Master’s thesis.
  • Master’s degree students must pass at least 45 ECTS per academic year. The active enrolment requirement is cumulative. This means by default that students must have earned 45 ECTS credits after the first year of study, 90 after the second year, and so on. Other rules may apply on your faculty - make sure to ask your student counsellor.
  • Master’s degree students must complete their degree programme within the prescribed study period plus 6 months. Read about the maximum time to degree further down this page.
  • These rules come into force on 1 September 2016.

What does this mean for you as a Master’s degree student?

In practice, this means that the requirement for compulsory registration for 60 ECTS per academic year will be abolished. However, compulsory registration for the Master’s thesis is still required. In future, the students must therefore register for exams and courses themselves. It is also possible for students to withdraw from courses and exams within a deadline set by the faculty.

An active enrolment requirement of 45 ECTS per academic year will be introduced for Master’s degree programmes.

Maximum time to degree will be introduced. The maximum time to degree for Master’s degree programmes is the prescribed study period plus six months. Read about the maximum time to degree further down this page. Read about the maximum time to degree further down this page.

Six months after the student should have completed his/her degree programme, a check will be carried out to see if the student has completed his/her degree programme within the specified time frame. The purpose of this is to identify and withdraw students who have not completed their degree programme.

Concerning the Master’s thesis:

Master’s degree students will automatically be registered for the Master’s thesis and it will not be possible to withdraw. The registration will be adjusted to make it possible for the student to complete his/her Master’s thesis using three attempts to pass within the maximum time to degree time frame.

When the student has been registered for the Master’s thesis, it is not possible to withdraw from any second or third attempt either. These attempts must be based on a revised thesis statement in accordance with the rules specified in the ministerial order.

It is still possible for the student to complete failed courses concurrently with his/her Master’s thesis within the framework of the active enrolment requirement and the maximum time to degree.

For Bachelor of Engineering graduates

The rules for BEng graduates will be updated in the year 2017 - until then, the existing rules are applicable.

Maximum time to degree - Bachelor's and Master's degree

If you start a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme in the autumn of 2016 or later, the following rules apply:

  • If you are taking a Bachelor’s degree at ST, Arts or Health, you may take six months longer to complete your degree than the prescribed time to degree. If you are taking a Bachelor’s degree at Aarhus BSS, you may take one year longer to complete your degree than the prescribed time to degree. In this context, six months corresponds to a semester including the examination period.
  • If you are taking a Master’s degree at ST, Arts, Health, or Aarhus BSS you may take six months longer to complete your degree than the prescribed time to degree. In this context, six months corresponds to a semester including the examination period.

There is also a maximum time to degree completion for students who are already enrolled in a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme – in other words, students who started their degree programme before autumn 2016.

  • The time limit for completing your degree is set in relation to the remaining prescribed time to degree as of 15 September 2016. You have six month in addition to the prescribed time to degree to complete your degree programme. In this context, six months corresponds to a semester including the examination period.  
  • If you started your degree programme before autumn 2016, you will receive a letter in September or October containing information about the maximum time limit for completing your degree programme.
  • If the academic regulations for your degree programme set a time limit for the completion of your degree programme, it is possible that this deadline applies instead. In such cases, please contact the student guidance office at your faculty to find out which time limit applies to you.

Whether your are a new students or already enrolled in a degree programme,

  • you are always welcome to contact the student guidance office at your faculty if you have questions about the time limits.

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